Bill Gates Has Always Been the Wealthiest Man: Beloit's Mindset List!

They've grown up with "selfies," same-sex marriage, Facebook "likes," and Harry Potter. That's right. The Mindset List for the Class of 2018 has arrived!

Beloit College has released the Mindset List with 51 more observations about the cultural reference points of fall’s entering class of freshmen. Since 1998, the Wisconsin college has marked the beginning of a new academic year with publication of this list of cultural touchstones for the incoming class. The brainchild of Beloit’s former Public Affairs Director Ron Nief and Keefer Professor of the Humanities Tom McBride, the Mindset List was originally created as a reminder to faculty to be aware of dated references. But it has taken on a life of its own. In fact, for the last few classes of incoming freshmen, there has always been a Mindset List!

Enjoy! And for more fun, visit their website here.

Friday Links for your Delight and Elevation


Awesome People Reading, a Tumblr, featuring Marilyn Monroe, Martin Luther King, Loki, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Woody Woodpecker... among others.

From DePaul University's Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management via the Facebook page of College Admissions Counselors: Time for the annual reminder of why we do what we do. John Ciardi's 1950–ish address to freshmen at Rutgers: Another School Year: Why? So many wonderful thoughts in this piece we couldn't pick one to excerpt. Read it in its entirety.

College Goes to the Movies -- Part 2

We had so much fun with college-going movies -- and TV series -- last week that we had to add a few more. So here for your enjoyment submitted by friends of the blog:

Star Trek This 2009 film presents the origin story of the iconic main characters from the Star Trek television series.  Amidst the alternate reality of time travel and life on other planets, the age-old themes of college admission are a subplot with Kirk trying to gain admittance to Starfleet Academy and Spock turning down the Vulcan Science Academy for Starfleet. If that doesn’t hook you, go for the great characters, good fun, and excellent special effects.

The History Boys A view of university from the other side of the pond, The History Boys follows a group of British school boys with the highest A-level scores at their grammar school as they’re tutored for the exams for entrance to Oxford and Cambridge. (This film should also be prescreened due to sexual situations.)

Colleges Know Who You Are and May See What You Do

What does your digital footprint look like? You may want to check it out. The use of social networking sites and Internet search engines in the admission process is on the rise. Increasing numbers of admission professionals are turning to Facebook, Twitter, Google and other online resources to learn more about prospective students.

Kaplan Test Prep's 2011 survey of college admission officers found that 24% of the colleges surveyed reported they have gone to an applicant's Facebook or other social networking page to learn more about them. That figure is up from 10% in 2008. Furthermore, 20% of schools have Googled applicants.  Kaplan also found that 12% percent of the admission officers who used social media or online tools found material that hurt the student's chance of admission -- usually postings of uncouth activities, plagiarism, alcohol use or other "illegal activities."

While most admission offices do not routinely follow a student's digital trail, students need to think about their use of social media and web presence -- including what others are saying about them online. Be aware that colleges may turn here to learn more about you. The internet has a long memory. Google yourself and see what comes up. A good rule of thumb going forward? Don't post anything you don't want a college admission officer -- or your grandmother -- to see.

A Must Read Report for Scholarship Applicants

A new report from Mark Kantrowitz, founder and publisher of FinAid.org and Fastweb.com,  is a must-read for scholarship applicants. Sponsored by Fastweb and the National Scholarship Providers Association (NSPA), the study found that about a quarter of scholarship providers are using Google and social media websites such as Facebook and LinkedIn, to screen applicants. They're looking primarily for one or more red flags, such as signs that an applicant might reflect badly on the scholarship sponsor.  The report includes recommendations for scholarship applicants -- reviewing their Facebook accounts, Googling themselves and correcting problems when possible, and using appropriate email addresses. Read the full report here. It's good advice for all applicants!