National Candidates Reply Date

Seniors: No Double Depositing

May 1, the National Candidates Reply Date, is the deadline for formally notifying one college you will accept its offer of admission -- and sealing the deal with a check for the nonrefundable deposit.  Keep in mind that you have signed a certification on your application form promising you will send a deposit to only one institution.  Double- depositing— sending deposits to two or more schools in order to keep your options open— takes places away from other students.  Your acceptance letter is conditional, and it’s easier than you think for the colleges to find out if you have deposited at more than one institution. If you ignore your ethical obligation and send deposits in to more than one school, you run the risk of both colleges rescinding your admission.

 

Seniors: A last to-do list

You're almost there... Here's a last To Do list to make sure you tie up all loose ends before the graduation celebrations begin:

  • Go back and thank all the people who made this possible for you.
  • Accept the offer of admission and submit a deposit by May 1 at the school where you will enroll.
  • Inform all other schools where you have been offered admission that you will not be enrolling. Remember you’re holding onto someone else’s spot.
  • Start getting to know the school you will attend for the next four years by forming relationships with classmates via social media.
  • Complete financial aid documentation by the designated deadline.
  • Make  arrangements to send your final transcript.

For more information about admission decisions, including your responsibilities in responding by May 1, see Chapter 17, “Notification and Making the Decision" in College Admission: From Application to Acceptance, Step by Step.

Seniors: No Double-Depositing!

A nonrefundable deposit will be due with your response to the college where you will enroll. Keep in mind that you have signed a certification on your application form promising you will send a deposit to only one institution.  Double- depositing— sending deposits to two or more schools in order to keep your options open— takes places away from other students.  Your acceptance letter is conditional, and it’s easier than you think for the colleges to find out if you have deposited at more than one institution. If you ignore your ethical obligation and send deposits in to more than one school, you run the risk of both colleges rescinding your admission.

 

For more information about admission decisions, including what to do if you're waitlisted, see Chapter 17, “Notification and Making the Decision" in College Admission: From Application to Acceptance, Step by Step.

National Candidates Reply Date

Today is the day! Students must formally notify one college that they are accepting its offer of admission -- and seal the deal with a deposit check. Congratulations!

But, of course, the school year and your college admission process are not quite over... You may still need to forward the results of your AP exams, deal with housing and even roommate selection at your chosen school for next year, and finish your senior year strong. Remember, acceptances are conditional and your entire senior year is important to colleges.

For a good summary of the steps you will need to keep in mind beyond today's decision, check out the excellent May Checklist for Seniors at The New York Times' Choice blog.

No Double-Depositing

May 1, the National Candidates Reply Date, is fast approaching. This is the non-negotiable deadline for formally notifying one college that you are accepting its offer of admission—and sealing the deal with a deposit check.

For those who have a top-choice school, the decision about where to send that check is straightforward. For others, choosing may require further thought, return visits, or the comparison of financial aid packages. Do not be tempted, however, to double-deposit in order to delay decision-making.

Double-depositing—sending a deposit to more than one college to keep your options open —is unethical and may result in both colleges rescinding your admission.

Keep in mind that you have signed a certification on your application form promising you will send a deposit to only one institution. Your acceptance letter is conditional, and it’s easier than you think for the colleges to find out if you have deposited at more than one institution. You also have an ethical obligation. Double-depositing takes places away from other students.